News

Wed
10
Jan

WMC welcomes first baby of 2018

 

Carter Egeland was the first baby born in the new year at Winneshiek Medical Center in Decorah. Arriving at 6:05 a.m. Monday, Jan. 1, Carter weighed 8 lbs. 5 oz. and measured 20½ inches. Welcoming her into the world were (l-r) dad Tyler and mom Lauren Egeland of Ossian. (submitted photo)

 

WMC welcomes first baby of 2018

 

 

 

Welcome, Carter Egeland! Carter was the first baby born in the new year at Winneshiek Medical Center in Decorah. 

He was born at 6:05 a.m. Monday, Jan. 1, 2018, weighing 8 lbs. 5 oz and measuring 20½ inches. 

Carter was welcomed by his parents, Tyler and Lauren Egeland, of Ossian. 

The family received many gifts donated by area businesses, including the following:

Wed
10
Jan

The path to the top for ISU Cyclones

 

Iowa State defensive end Carson Lensing of Calmar was greeted by his parents, Ernie and Sherri Lensing, following the Cyclones’ 21-20 in the Liberty Bowl on Saturday, Dec. 30, in Memphis. (submitted photo)

 

The path to the top for ISU Cyclones

 

 

 

Zakary Kriener

News Writer
zkriener@fayettepublishing.com

 

The last time the Iowa State University Cyclones were victorious in a football bowl game was Dec. 31, 2009. Lifelong fan Carson Lensing, who is now a redshirt sophomore and defensive end for the ‘Clones, remembers it vividly.

“I was in sixth-grade, and it was the Insight Bowl against Minnesota,” recalled Lensing. “Don’t quote me on any of this, but I believe we won by a score of 14-13.”

It turns out he was spot-on. ISU did indeed beat the Golden Gophers by a score of 14-13, showing Lensing’s dedication and passion for the team he loves. 

Fast-forward eight years to Dec. 30, 2017, and the Cyclones were back in the postseason for the first time since the Insight Bowl. The team entered the 2017 Liberty Bowl with a 7-5 overall record after a breakthrough season that included wins over the No. 3 and No. 12-ranked teams in the country.

“It was very cool to be a part of a team that was able to accomplish so much this season,” said Lensing, a 2016 graduate of South Winneshiek High School, “But we’re not satisfied!”

Wed
10
Jan

Casey's to host grand reopening in Clermont

 

Casey’s General Store in Clermont will host a Grand Reopening event on Friday, Jan. 12, to celebrate the expansion of the business’s building. Casey’s employees, including (front, l-r) general manager Henrietta De La Rosa, Lisa LaBrec, and Michelle Welsch; (second row) Carly Monroe, Tracy Kurdelmeyer, and Karen Fraser; (back) Zachary Monroe and Lorna Chapman are excited to show off the new kitchen. Not pictured are Vickie Chicken, Andrea Dummermuth, Kiana Jones, and Bryce Messler.

 

Casey's to host grand reopening in Clermont

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

Casey’s to host grand reopening in Clermont

 

Chris DeBack

cdeback@fayettepublishing.com

 

Wed
10
Jan

Young NF/NFV artists' work goes online

 

Local art teachers Mina Fantz and Annie Adams (l-r) work with North Fayette Elementary first- and second-graders (l-r) Mikah Opperman, Eva Sayer, Max McElree, Kypton McGrane, Eli Novak and Sophia Gardner on an art project. The instructors just recently connected the young artists of North Fayette and Valley elementary schools and North Fayette Valley Middle School to the online art gallery Artsonia, where the students can develop their own portfolios as well as share their work with their families and friends.  (Megan Molseed photo) 

 

Young NF/NFV artists' work goes online

 

 

Megan Molseed

Contributing Writer

 

 

“In this age it’s nice to have a platform like this to share the work the kids are doing with parents and their family members,” said North Fayette Valley art teacher Mina Fantz of her recent move, along with North Fayette fifth- and sixth-grade art teacher Annie Adams, to link the NFV art students with the online art studio Artsonia, the “World’s Largest Student Art Museum.” 

“We know the students work so hard on their projects at all ages, but it’s also a reality that paintings or pictures get stuffed in the bottom of book bags or 3-D art gets broken on the bus,” continued Fantz.

“With this website, we can upload the students’ creations, and they will be there in their portfolios for years to come.”

Wed
10
Jan

First baby in 2018

 

Liam Paul Kuennen, son of Sydney Kuennen and Riley Brincks of Fort Atkinson, is the first baby born in 2018 at Gundersen Palmer Lutheran Hospital in West Union. Liam was born at 6:52 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018, weighing 8 lbs. 10¼ oz. and measuring 21 inches. (photo submitted)

 

First baby in 2018

Wed
10
Jan

Fayette County Cattlemen select royalty

Fayette County Cattlemen select royalty

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

The Fayette County Cattlemen’s Association 2018 Annual Membership Banquet will start with social time at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 20, at the Waucoma Event Center. 

Paid memberships receive two free meal tickets with extra tickets available for purchase for $17. Contact Blake Rau at (563) 920-4537 or by email at blakerau@hotmail.com to reserve your tickets. 

Once again, the Fayette County Cattlemen will be naming a Fayette County Beef Queen and Princess, as well as Li’l Miss Cowgirls. Last year’s Beef Princess Rachel Darnall will become the 2018 Fayette County Beef Queen, receiving the crown from the 2017 Beef Queen Macy Halverson. Kelsey Pagel has been selected as the 2018 Fayette County Beef Princess. This year, the Fayette County Cattlemen will honor two girls, Alex Steinbronn and Braelyn Meyer, as Li’l Miss Cowgirls for the association. 

 

Wed
10
Jan

Gamm named 2017 Citizen of the Year

Roger Gamm - 2017 Citizen of the Year

 

Gamm named 2017 Citizen of the Year

 

 

By Chris Deback
cdeback@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

 

For more than 60 years, only three men have held the position of fire chief at the West Union Fire Department. 

Since the mid-1950s, the local fire department has been under the direction of L.T. “Speed” Phillips (1955-1983), Charlie “Chuck” Broghammer (1983-2004), and Roger Gamm (2004-2017). 

A fourth, Rory Starks, was recently added to that list when this fall Gamm decided not to seek re-election as fire chief. While he has been the leader of the department for the last 13 years, it is his 4½ decades of answering the fire whistle in the service of fire protection for the citizens of West Union that has him being recognized as The Fayette County Union’s “2017 Citizen of the Year.”

The Union will bestow this honor on Gamm at the West Union Chamber — A Main Street Community’s 2018 Community Awards Banquet on Saturday, Jan. 20. He joins several other West Union residents who are receiving volunteer awards from the Chamber that evening. 

Wed
03
Jan

Deer harvest up in 2017

Deer harvest up in 2017

 

 

 

According to the Iowa Department of Natural Resourses (DNR), as of Tuesday, Dec. 19, the 2017 Iowa deer harvest is officially more than 5 percent ahead of the 2016 totals. The fall of 2017 saw 90,955 deer reported, up from 86,506 for the same period last year.

In its 2016 Trends in Iowa Wildlife Populations and Harvest Report, the Iowa DNR predicted an annual reported deer harvest of between 100,000 to 120,000. Iowa’s final two deer hunting seasons, the late muzzleloader season and archery season, conclude on Jan. 10, 2018.

 
Wed
03
Jan

Ancestry test drives motivation to discover Norsk cousins

 

Janell Bradley is pictured in the home of her third cousin Terje Kvås. A fish farmer and beekeeper, Terje lives in the village of Kvås, Norway, from which some of Bradley’s ancestors emigrated back in the 1850s. (Jeff Bradley photo)

 

Ancestry test drives motivation to discover Norsk cousins

 

 

Janell Bradley

 

 

 

It all began with a desire to get more connected with my Scandinavian heritage.

Until last spring, I had pushed aside suggestions to take an ancestry DNA test because I thought it would just confirm what I already knew – ancestry that’s roughly 75 percent German and 25 percent Norwegian. 

My paternal great-great-grandparents Lars Fundingsland and Leva Larsdatter and my great-grandma Gertena Quass’ father, Lars Christian Larsjen Kvås, were all born in Norway. Lars’ wife, Anna Synneva Julia Saboe, was born in Fayette County in 1852 but was also of Norwegian descent. That was about the extent of my knowledge of my Norsk heritage. 

What I didn’t know until recently is that a person doesn’t necessarily inherit an exact 50 percent of DNA from each parent. I decided to take a “23andme” DNA test. Getting the results in late spring, I learned my Norwegian bloodlines were intent on persevering, as my pie chart indicates I am 34 percent Scandinavian. My remaining heritage wasn’t as clear-cut as I had believed, with evidence of Irish, Scottish, British, and Polish bloodlines, along with the German genes of which I had known.

Through “23andme,” a list of 1,158 others known to share my DNA was made available to me – even if our common chromosomes were slight in number. Excited to think I might find living relatives in Norway, I browsed through the list and sent out a few query emails to potential cousins with Norwegian-appearing surnames. 

It wasn’t long before I connected with Gunhild Baldersheim, who shared my passion for genealogy. We promptly began trading emails and even daily messages through social media. Because she could read Norwegian and decipher old church records, her assistance was invaluable as I began to build my family tree online. 

Wed
03
Jan

43 years, 1100 games & still going

 

Being the “Voice of TigerHawk Basketball” is more than just announcing. Here, Gay Bowden meticulously fills in the official score sheet before a recent game. During the game, he must keep track of team scores, individual shooting records, fouls, and so on. Afterwards, Bowden has to total everything and sign off as a complete and accurate record. (Jerry Wadian photo)

 

43 years, 1100 games & still going

 

 

By Jerry Wadian
jwadian@thefayettecountyunion.com

 

 

 

People attending high school basketball games in West Union have been hearing the same voice announcing the contests since 1972.

The man behind the microphone is Gay Bowden, who started in 1972 when the boys’ and girls’ basketball coaches Dennis Cullinan and Keith Markow were looking for a new announcer.

However, the job entails more than just using a microphone. The person also had to be the official scorekeeper, i.e., keep a record of all of the official stats as they happen and tabulate them once the game is over.

In fact, Bowden believes being the scorekeeper is far more important than the announcing.

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